Posts archived in PSA

It's Time - Get Up Australia

Check out the emotional PSA below from Get Up Australia, a not-for-profit organization that wants to “build a progressive Australia and bring participation back into [Australia's] democracy”.

I’ve seen many Facebook, Twitter and Google Plus friends sharing this video over the past couple of days, describing it as “beautiful”, “stunning”, etc.

Personally I’m a little underwhelmed by the piece. I’m an openly gay man, but I also tend to be very pragmatic. Rational (as opposed to emotional) appeals work better for me.

Of course, it may also have something to do with that fact that I personally don’t want to EVER get married. I understand that many members of the LGBT community want that right though, and I think that they should have it if their heterosexual counterparts can. (It’s the logical thing to do.)

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Stop Online Spying campaign by Open Media
Photo: StopSpying.ca

Stop Online Spying is a campaign that aims to let people know about the Canadian government’s plan to give the police more access to people’s online history.

Open Media, the organization behind the campaign, just released three public service announcements to support this campaign. They’re hoping that the videos will help get more people to sign the Stop Online Spying petition.

The videos do not have the best production, but they do effectively deliver the message. The ironic and straightforward script allow regular folks (who otherwise wouldn’t care) to understand the issue. There’s a little bit of fear appeal used here, but the videos are more funny than they are scary.

But of course, just like most PSAs, the videos are a bit one-sided and probably do not capture the complexity of  the issue. That said, it’s a good first step in engaging people in this issue, and hopefully everyone will try to find out more after seeing the videos.

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Love is Louder 2.

Love is Louder is an online movement that aims to show support to those who have ever felt “mistreated, misunderstood or isolated”. It’s a direct response to last year’s multiple teenage suicides in the US. As a social campaign, Louder aims to build on the momentum of other online campaigns (such as the “It Gets Better” campaign) to invite those who have been bullied into the conversation.

Although many celebrities have already been involved with this campaign, I’ve never heard of it until recently. I was channel surfing when the commercial below — featuring some CTV personalities — came on and immediately caught my attention.

I’ve already written before about the use of advertising in social campaigns. In a previous blog post, I’ve said that the use of emotional appeals bring up some ethical issues that marketers need to address. What I didn’t mention in that blog post is that the type of emotions matter: negative ones such as fear or guilt definitely have ethical implications.

What I like about this “Love is Louder” video though is that it uses positive emotions to drive home its message.  Similar to the “It Gets Better” campaign, Louder gives hope to the victims instead of going after the bullies.

Unfortunately, bullying is something that many people have experienced in their lives, and reminding kids that “love is louder” hopefully offer these kids optimism for the future.  I’ve never been bullied (thankfully), but as a gay man, I do know first hand that life gets easier as you grow older. So, hang on, kids, and in the meantime, talk to your parents or call the Kids Help Phone line if you’re being bullied.