how to increase facebook reach

Recently, Eat24, a food delivery service, made a lot of noise on social media for writing a break-up letter to Facebook and closing down its Facebook page a few days after.

It’s a PR and SEO ploy—and for the most part, it worked.

But as I’ve written in a recent LinkedIn post, Eat24 made a huge mistake leaving Facebook. The social network is still, by far, the biggest. And for B2C, it still has the most engagement compared to Twitter or Google+.

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Is the social media manager role really dying?

Last week, I published an article on LinkedIn about the evolution of the social media manager role.

The inspiration for the post was another LinkedIn article—one that was published by Hootsuite Founder Ryan Holmes:

Last year, Hootsuite’s Ryan Holmes proclaimed the role of social media manager dead. He cited a study that found that the growth in positions with the title “social media manager” has slowed down by 50% between 2012 and 2013.

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creativity in marketing

When I was in my teens, I never really related to the term “creative.” I can’t draw—the best I can do are stick people. I’ve never tried painting, and I can’t play a single musical instrument.

But recently because of some restructuring at work, I started thinking more about this particular label. I was recently put under the “creative” group in our marketing team, making me question whether I’ve been creative all along and I just didn’t know it. Maybe what I do as a social media manager is just as creative as what our graphic designer does or what our videographers execute?

This recent change in my work raised other important questions for me: What does it mean to be creative? And are creative people born or are they made? Can we work on becoming more creative? What is creativity to begin with? In many jobs, including digital and content marketing, creativity is required, so I wanted to look into this topic a bit more.

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the rise of long-form content
Photo credit: Steve Rhodes (Flickr)

“This blog post is too long.”

“We need to cut this down to 500 words.”

“Make this shorter. Maybe split the blog post into two?”

As a social media manager, I’ve heard these comments numerous times before. Many marketers are biased against long-form content. “Less is more,” they claim. “People have short attention spans.”

It is true that being concise is often a good thing. That’s why Twitter is such a hit: It forces us to distill our thoughts and communicate only what’s truly important.

But having short content for the sake of having short content is not valuable…and it’s not a good content strategy. Brevity shouldn’t come at the price of completeness.

The rise of Big Content

In the past year, several well-respected SEO and marketing folks have been advocating for “big content.” And when people say “big content,” they often mean long-form content. But it’s worth noting that marketers and analysts are using the term “big content” differently:

  • Craig Roth from Gartner says big content is “a term that helps highlight the subset of Big Data related to the less-structured side of it.  Big Content isn’t new or different than Big Data; rather it helps focus on uses of Big Data for unstructured information for the kind of folks that think the Library of Congress is filled with ‘content’, not ‘data.’”
  • Contrast this with this definition from Moz’s Dr. Peter J. Meyers’ definition. He says big content is the type of content that takes time and effort, that breaks the mold and that talks about big concepts. In other words, he’s talking about pieces of content—either a blog post, an interactive infographic, an ebook, etc.—that is well-researched and that is often (but not always) lengthy.

Big content should serve a higher purpose in your company than just to increase pageviews. In this post, my focus is more aligned with Moz’s definition. I’ll cover why long-form content should be part of your content marketing mix. (To be clear, I am not advocating that you stop creating shorter blog posts. The point of this post is to highlight why creating long-form content in addition to shorter pieces is a great idea.)

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upworthy - content creation
Photo: Steve Rhodes (Creative Commons)

Love Upworthy’s headlines? Here’s the secret to their success.

Actually, scratch that. Recently, Upworthy—the left-leaning viral content website and the fastest growing media site of all time—provided some helpful tips on how to create viral content.

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